Richard Lapchick

Endowed Chair, DeVos Sports Business Management Program

Richard Lapchick

Endowed Chair, DeVos Sports Business Management Program

Human rights activist, pioneer for racial equality, internationally recognized expert on sports issues, scholar and author Richard E. Lapchick is often described as “the racial conscience of sport.” He brought his commitment to equality and his belief that sport can be an effective instrument of positive social change to University of Central Florida where he accepted an endowed chair in August 2001 to lead the DeVos Sports Business Management Program which has been named the #2 program in the world.
Lapchick is a regular columnist for ESPN.com and the Sports Business Journal
• He has written 16 books
• given more than 2,800 public speeches
• Was named the Florida Public Citizen of the Year in 2006
• Lapchick has been the recipient of numerous humanitarian awards including the
• Lifetime Achievement Award for Work in Civil Rights from the Rev. Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow/Push Coalition in 2009
• was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame of the Commonwealth Nations in the category of Humanitarian along with Arthur Ashe and Nelson Mandela
• was inducted into the Multi-Ethnic Hall of Fame, the Central Florida Hall of Fame, the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame and the Sport in Society Hall of Fame
• was honored by the Basketball Hall of Fame, the National Basketball Retired Players Association, the Black Coaches Association, the Women’s Coaches Alliance, the Women’s Sports Foundation, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Harvard Medical School, the NCAA and the Holocaust Center
• he has received nine honorary degrees
• He is listed in Who’s Who in America
• Named one of the 100 Most Powerful People in Sports
• Named as one of Beyond Sports Inspirational 50 people (living and passed) who used sport to change the world along with Billie Jean King, Muhammad Ali and Nelson Mandela.
• Was one of 200 guests personally invited by Nelson Mandela to his inauguration after leading the American sports boycott of South Africa from 1975 until the end of Apartheid.